Local guides

Looking for culture, activities, attractions, entertainment, the insider knowledge on the best places to eat and drink, or do you simply want to shop 'til you drop? Our expert local guides are here to help you plan your time away.

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Featured Guide: Cardiff

From historic houses to cutting-edge architecture, sporting superstars to world famous masterpieces, you’ll discover all this and much, much more in Europe’s youngest capital city. Rich in heritage, arts and culture, not to mention plenty of fun activities, Cardiff is the perfect destination for families, couples and groups.

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|Cardiff

London guide

With world-class theatre in the West End and historic landmarks fit for royalty, there’s no shortage of fun and exciting things to do in London. From Buckingham Palace to Big Ben, there’s plenty of items you’ll be able to tick off your travel bucket list. In fact there’s so much to see, it’s hard to know what to do first. 

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Edinburgh guide

From the atmospheric old town, to the elegant Georgian new town, Edinburgh is waiting to be explored. Discover Edinburgh Castle, party at the Hogmanay celebrations, and explore the many listed buildings. And with more Michelin-starred restaurants than any city outside London, Scotland’s capital is a foodie paradise.

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Manchester guide

The unofficial capital of the north and one of the most exciting cities in the UK, Manchester is bursting with activities and attractions. It’s home to some of Britain’s biggest musical legends, famous landmarks (Old Trafford, or The Etihad), a cool arts and culture scene and world-famous sports.

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Glasgow guide

Voted the ‘friendliest city in the world’, and named a must-visit by lots of top travel writers, Glasgow is a great short break destination. Expect world-class architecture, a vibrant café scenebeautiful scenery and excellent shopping from Scotland’s second city.

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Birmingham guide

Shop at the iconic Bullring centre. Visit the Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery. Explore the city by canal. Birmingham is a city of surprises. And there’s always something going on — from comedy festivals to literary events, you’ll never run out of things to do.

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Liverpool guide

A European Capital of Culture, a UNESCO World Heritage Site and more museums than any city outside London, Liverpool has a lot to shout about. Include heritage, pop culture, entertainment and the football and you can see why it's a popular city break destination.

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Leeds guide

Brimming with the energy you find in university towns, Leeds deserves its reputation as the ‘Knightsbridge of the North’. Whether it's music, theatre or a host of sporting attractions, if you think it's grim up North, stay at one of our Leeds hotels and you’ll discover it’s anything but.

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Newcastle guide

Perched on the edge of the River Tyne, Newcastle has a proud industrial heritage, cutting edge contemporary art, superb shopping and legendary nightlife. The city is packed full of attractions, bustling markets and great places to eat, you’ll always find cultural diversity in Newcastle.

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York guide

The northern city of York has a big story to tell. A medieval marvel, modern shopping hub and a treasure trove of pubs serving proper Yorkshire grub. From fascinating museums and archaeological wonders to shopping all tastes and hunting for ghosts - finding things to see won’t be a problem.

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Cardiff guide

Cardiff is the perfect destination for activities, great entertainment and family attractions. You'll see plenty of sports stars at the Principality Stadium and masterpieces in museums across the city. Discover all this in Europe’s youngest capital city.

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Blackpool guide

If you love vibrant seaside towns full of nostalgia and tradition, Blackpool will be right up your promenade. You’ll find fabulous art deco buildings, beautifully preserved ballrooms, the Winter Gardens, seven miles of golden sands, theme parks and vintage trams.

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Sheffield guide

Known as ‘the Steel City’ thanks to its industrial heritage, Sheffield is a thoroughly modern metropolis with a thriving cultural scene, one of the largest shopping malls in the country, the Crucible Theatre and is at the edge of the Peak District National Park.

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Harrogate guide

On the doorstep of the Yorkshire Dales, the spa town of Harrogate is perfectly placed to explore the great outdoors with an abundance of pubs and restaurants – and with Bettys Café Tea Rooms – you won’t be left wondering what to do in Harrogate.

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Sunderland guide

Whether you’re on the terraces of the Stadium of Light, catching the biggest names on stage at the Empire Theatre, or enjoying one of many Blue Flag nearby beaches, or learning about Sunderland’s history at one of its museums, Sunderland won’t disappoint, pet.

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Preston guide

Preston exploded in popularity during the Industrial Revolution, becoming a Victorian powerhouse centred around textiles. Factor in its football team and bustling entertainmentnightlife and eating out options, and you’ll never be left wondering what to do in Preston.

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Coventry guide

From the magnificant statue of Lady Godiva, to the medieval roots of this city; and from its wartime past through to its evolution as a modern city, there are many attractions and activities to indulge in so you’ll never be left wondering what to do in Coventry

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Leicester guide

East Midlands’ largest city has hit the headlines thanks to Leicester City’s enthralling underdog story and the discovery and reburial of King Richard III at Leicester Cathedral. There’s plenty to like about the city that brought us the Attenborough brothers and Walkers crisps.

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Northampton guide

Sports fans can enjoy Silverstone, the home to British motor racing, first-class county cricket and cheer on the revered Northampton Saints rugby team, while culture hounds will appreciate the abundance of theatregalleries and museums in Northampton.

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Stratford-upon-Avon

See a Shakespeare play in either The Royal Shakespeare Theatre or The Swan Theatre. We will tell you about the theatres to visit, show you nearby restaurants and provide a tour of the town’s Shakespearean sights.

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Durham guide

With an abundance of attractions and activities, you’ll never be left wondering what to do in Durham. It's a pocket-sized city steeped in history and beautiful relics from the past and it’s hard not to be swept up by the charm of the place.

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Chester guide

A beguiling mix of the old and new, Chester continues to grow on you long after you visit. With 2,000 years of history, the city’s Roman walls are the best preserved in the UK. And thanks to new developments, the city has some of the best attractions in the north west.

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Doncaster guide

Home to the UK’s only polar bears, Roman wallsmedieval castles and a lively food and nightlife scene, you won’t be left wondering what to do in Doncaster. Sports fans can enjoy Doncaster Racecourse and Doncaster Rovers Belles, one of the UK’s most successful female football teams.

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Bristol guide

There must be something in the water - how else could one city produce a constant stream of musical and artistic talent? Then there’s Bristol’s illustrious maritime and ecological legacy, the Clifton Suspension Bridge and the many places to indulge in a craft ale, or  cider, or two.

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Derby guide

Vibrant Derby has an impressive restaurant scene, a great sporting history and lots of historical buildings. Plus Donnington Park on your doorstep, not to mention Alton Towers nearby, so you’re never far from your next adventure!

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Swansea guide

Thanks to a renovated marina and waterfront, Swansea is a good looking city that makes the most of its stunning 20-mile-long coastline. Alongside an array of museums, theatres, shopping centres, surf schools, medieval castles and the famous Mumbles Mile pub crawl.

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Bedford guide

The market town of Bedford dates back to Medieval times and winds its way around the Great Ouse river. You’ll also find Victorian-era shopping arcades, collections of watercolours, a range of festivals and annual events, plus some impressive live music and theatre spaces.

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Solihull guide

Solihull has one of the best food scenes in the region with a number of great restaurants where you’ll have a meal to remember. Our guide delves into all of the exciting activities and attractions, including the excellent Touchwood shopping centre and the National Motorcycle Museum.

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Gloucester guide

Blending history with a modern day sensibility, Gloucester acts as a gateway to the river Severn and the stunning Cotswolds. It has an amazing cultural heritage from the centuries-old pubs to fine-dining restaurants. That history is balanced with the modern touch of the Gloucester Quays.

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Newport guide

Once defined by its Roman heritage, the river-front Theatre and Art Gallery has given the city a cultural focus, while the Newport Velodrome and Riverfront Arts Centre offers sport and entertaiment. With lots of Newports across the world, we think this one is the best.

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Milton Keynes guide

There’s a lot to love about Britain’s most successful new town. Superb places to eat and go out at night, plus plenty of green spaces means it’s perfect for exploring. It has state of the art facilities, including the Xscape arena and visitor attraction Bletchley Park is just up the road. 

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Exeter guide

For a small city with a big heritage, Exeter provides a host of attractions ensuring you’ll never be left wondering what to do. Cue an alluring foodie scene, scenic outdoor activities and a variety of stage and screen entertainment with plenty of options for when the sun goes down.

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Oxford guide

You’d be hard-pressed to find anywhere with as much history as Oxford. Home to the oldest museum in the world, the oldest English-language university and castles, you could spend days discovering the city’s heritage. Plus there's cool cafés, fine-dining restaurantsand markets.

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Colchester guide

Colchester is the oldest recorded town in Britain with more than 2,000 years of history. There are landmarks and attractions from every era, the most popular being the magnificent Colchester Castle. It’s got thriving theatres, as well as some top-class restaurants and cafés.

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Poole guide

Sit on sandy beaches, explore exquisite countryside and revel in the wonders of the Jurassic Coast. Poole is brimming with history and has become a bustling destination with great barsrestaurants, cafés, shops, museums and a fantastic quayside area that’s ripe for exploring.

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Reading guide

Maybe best known for its three-day music festival, there’s another side to Reading worth exploring that includes some amazing live music venues and an incredible eight-sided theatre. It's one of the largest towns in the UK more barspubs and clubs than you could shake a cocktail stick at.

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Swindon guide

The historic market town of Swindon is a perfect blend of history and modernity. With grand country parkstheatresart galleries and several outstanding museums covering everything from the region’s rich railway heritage to the rise of computers, you won’t be left wondering what to do.

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Bath guide

Bath is one of the most picturesque cities in the country with incredible examples of Georgian architecture – like the Royal Crescent and The Circus. And there are places like the gloriously gothic Bath Abbey, and Roman Baths – meaning you’ll never be left wondering what to do.

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Cheltenham guide

Cheltenham is home to the best festivals, which attract everyone from literature lovers to horse-racing fanatics. Sudeley Castle provides one of the best days out in England. Cheltenham also boasts a fantastic food scene with dishes concocted from the finest Cotswold produce.

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Carlisle guide

Huddled at the edge of the Lake District and within touching distance of the Scottish border, in Carlisle you’ll find the distinguished charm of a city close to some of the country’s most marked history. When it comes to what to do in Carlisle, you won’t be disappointed.

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Lincoln guide

Home to the steepest shopping street you’ll ever drag yourself up and the country’s first ever Christmas market. We delve into its famous tourist attractions – the cathedral, castle and Steep Hill – but to give you a bit of local flavour, we’ll include tips on the restaurants and pubs.

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Telford guide

Telford has a rich history and a bright future. The Iron Bridge is its top attraction and was the first bridge in the world to be cast from iron. Make suer you spend some time exploring the museums and sampling the great cafés, restaurants, nightlife spot.

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Nottingham guide

A sporting powerhouse, a cultural beacon and home to a notorious, albeit mythical do-gooder in green tights, Nottingham is truly one of our favourite cities. Drink a fine ale in one of the sandstone caverns in the oldest pub in Britain or dine at some truly inventive restaurants.

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Cambridge guide

The home of one of the oldest universities in the world, this iconic city boasts stunning historic buildings and a vibrant cultural scene, meaning you’re never left wondering what to do. Plus, with a wide range of high-class restaurants on offer, you won't be short of places to eat either.

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Weymouth guide

Hailed as one of the UK’s first modern tourist resorts, Weymouth has a regal past as the once-summer residence of King George III. Since then, holidaymakers have been attracted by the mild climate, shallow waters and Weymouth Beach’s long arc of golden sands that has since become the number one beach in the UK. 

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Aberdeen guide

With over 300 castles, several cathedrals and the quaint fishing village of Footdee, almost untouched for over a century, Aberdeen has a rich history, which is best illustrated in its many museums, art galleries and historical buildings.

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Bournemouth guide

Bournemouth is the UK’s most popular seaside town. It combines endless golden sands, charming Victorian architecture and panoramic ocean views from its award-winning gardens. Lucky enough to get warmer weather than most other parts of the UK.

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Eastbourne guide

Eastbourne has pretty much everything you’d want from a coastal town, and then some. The town is littered with historic buildings, including a stunning Napoleonic fort and the truly iconic Beachy Head lighthouse, while the Grand Parade that handsomely separates the beach from the town is full of prime Victorian-era architecture. 

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Dover guide

Global seaport and home of the iconic White Cliffs, but there is so much more to Dover than this. It's surrounded by Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty and has a historic role on the frontline of both world wars to its time dealing illegal alcohol across the seas.

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Taunton guide

Taunton is the county town of Somerset; it’s a place with a rich military history and religious roots that go back for more than 1,000 years – the monastery is still standing today, at least the barn is, although it’s now home to the Somerset Cricket Museum.

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Ipswich guide

Ipswich has historically been a prosperous trading port with settlements dating back to Roman times. Today, you’ll find that the historic waterfront of industrial docks has become a hub of activity, with restaurants, bars, cafés and art spaces lining the marina, with attractive Tudor buildings across the town and a beautiful collection of artwork at the Wolsey Art Gallery.

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Dundee guide

Dundee is a hub of culture, art, theatre and history. Discover dangerous voyages to Antarctica, tour some truly impressive historical buildings and feast at a host of delicious restaurants guaranteed to feed your senses and with stunning views out over the Firth of Tay.

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Newquay guide

The surfing capital of the UK is home to sandy beaches, stunning views, cracking seafood restaurants and Boardmasters – a world-class music and extreme sports festival. With so much on offer, you’ll never be left wondering what to do in Newquay. 

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Plymouth guide

Thanks to its rich maritime history, stunning waterfront and globally important harbour, Plymouth has every right to call itself Britain’s Ocean City. Much of the city was destroyed during the Plymouth Blitz of World War II, so it now offers a unique blend of historic buildings and modern developments

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Southend-on-Sea guide

We do like to be beside the seaside, don't we? And if you had to pick the perfect resort to visit for a taste of a traditional British weekend of sandcastles, ice cream and fish and chips, Southend-on-Sea would surely be close to the top of the list. 

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Inverness guide

Home to our most northern hotels, Inverness is the gateway to the stunning Scottish Highlands, a truly mystical and magical area. From whisky distilleries galore to the fabled Loch Ness monster, Inverness is the largest city in the north and also, according to a recent survey, the happiest!

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Brighton guide

Situated on the south coast, Brighton is a major UK city with a unique blend of culture and heritage. Our local guide will take you through the best places to eat and drink, as well as outlining the most popular entertainment venues, cultural landmarks, attractions, shopping destinations and activities, so you’ll never be left wondering what to do in Brighton.

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Portsmouth guide

A historic coastal city that’s given the world some incredible authors including Charles Dickens, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Rudyard Kipling, Portsmouth is a fascinating blend of history and culture, of museums and modern-day entertainment. The cultural and event scene is dominated by the New Theatre Royal and the Guildhall.

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Norwich guide

As the city with a church for every Sunday of the year and a pub for every day, Norwich boasts bags of history but blends it with some of the best nightlife in East Anglia. From the Middle Ages through to the Industrial Revolution, Norwich was the second largest city in the country behind the capital and it’s home to some of the finest examples of Norman architecture in the country, paid for by the city’s booming textiles and pottery industries.

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Southampton guide

One of the UK’s major ports, this south-coast city is famed for its maritime heritage. However, when you delve deeper into Southampton’s history and culture, you will find it has much more to offer, such as medieval buildings, legendary theatres and famous sporting arenas.

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Chelmsford guide

Well connected to the capital yet much more than a London commuter town, the city of Chelmsford offers a bustling foodie scene, shopping hub and varied nightlife of sleek bars, live music and jam-packed theatre programmes. Nestled in the heart of the Essex countryside and along the River Can, it’s the perfect base to explore the delights of the great English outdoors.

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Cornwall guide

The sandy beaches, world-class surf and laid-back attitude of Cornwall have long been attracting holiday goers from across the UK. It’s the home of the pasty, it’s the cider county, and it’s also got a vibrant food scene for you to sink your teeth into. Beyond the beauty of this beautiful stretch of coastline, and idyllic inland countryside, there’s a buzz to Cornwall that – when you know where to look – attracts visitors back time and time again.

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Basildon guide

To give you an idea of Basildon’s diversity, it’s the town that gave us the  world-famous actress of ‘Carry On’ film fame Joan Sims, the sexy synth rockers Depeche Mode, and the bastion of British culture that is Bob the Builder. Our local guide is just as eclectic in places, especially when it comes to places to eat, and things to do during the day

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Kidderminster guide

The wonderful town of Kidderminster is the birthplace of the modern carpet industry, and Led Zeppelin’s Robert Plant. That goes some way to giving you an idea of how varied a town Kidderminster is. During your stay take a trip back in time aboard the steam locomotives of the Severn Valley Railway.

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Warrington guide

From family days out at Gulliver’s World to a thriving Cultural Quarter home to the renowned Parr Hall and from cool bars, pubs and cafés to one of the most successful rugby league teams in the UK, you’ll never be left wondering what to do in Warrington.

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|Warrington guide

Hull guide

A rejuvenated city once more the pride of the north, Hull has overcome its staid, industrial image and was recently named the UK City of Culture until 2020. With a thriving food and bar scene, a hat-trick of theatres and top-class sports teams, as well as an award-winning aquarium, the colossal Humber Bridge and a busy and buzzing waterfront.

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|Hull guide

Perth guide

The gateway to the Highlands, and just an hour from Glasgow and Edinburgh, Perth is perfectly placed to take in all the action. On the banks of the River Tay, the city is packed full of history and plenty of entertainment.

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|Perth guide

Fort William guide

The outdoor capital of the UK, Fort William has so much to offer visitors. Whether it’s a quiet Loch-side walk or hair-raising white water rafting, tranquil forest cycling or world-class downhill mountain bike routes, there’s something for every traveller and tourist.

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|Fort William guide

Bury guide

Nestled on the outskirts of Manchester, Bury is a vibrant market town with lots going on. With culinary delights such as The Clarence, award-winning pubs like The Eagle and Child, landmarks such as Peel Tower and sporting entertainment at Bury FC, our guide helps you plan the best way to spend your time.

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|Bury guide

Bolton guide

This former mill town is home to over 260,000 ‘Boltonians’, a community famed for their friendliness and sense of humour, and epitomised by residents such as Peter Kay and Sara Cox. In one of the biggest towns in the country, you will find award-winning food and drinks establishments, a wide range of activities and attractions, and an entertainment scene featuring some brilliant live theatres and Bolton Wanderers football club.

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|Bolton guide

St. Andrews guide

Famous for its golf course and its university – both of which are some of the oldest of their kind in the world – there’s a lot more to St Andrews than birdies and books. A gorgeous coastal town 30 miles from Edinburgh, it’s home to medieval streets, historic buildings, including the stunning cathedral and castle ruins, amazing North Sea beaches and some of the best bars, cafés, pubs and restaurants on the east coast of Scotland.

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|St. Andrews guide

Stirling guide

Famous for its castle, a striking medieval fortress built on volcanic cliffs overlooking the River Forth, Stirling has been at the heart of Scottish history for centuries. From the Old Jail to some of Scotland’s most historic pubs, The Old Town is alive with amazing sights and architecture, while the entertainment scene is buzzing thanks to cultural institutions such as the Albert Halls, Tolbooth and the Macroberts Art Centre.

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|Stirling guide

Wakefield guide

If you’re wondering what to do in Wakefield, then you’ve come to the right place. The city has a fair few strings to its bow. It’s the birthplace of two of Britain’s most celebrated sculptors, Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore, it has a rich industrial heritage and is the home of the National Coal Mining Museum, but most notably of all, it’s the capital city of the Rhubarb Triangle.

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|Wakefield guide

Ayr guide

With world-class golf, mile-after-mile of sandy beaches and the birthplace of renowned Scottish poet Robert Burns, Ayr is a bustling seaside town on the west coast of Scotland. There’s more to Ayr than just dozens of golf courses though, including the world-famous Royal Troon, some of the best beaches in the country and museums and monuments dedicated to Robert Burns.

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|Ayr guide

Stockport guide

Stockport was once a beacon of the hat making industry that exported to every corner of the globe and is now one of Greater Manchester’s most vibrant towns with plenty going on. If you find yourself captivated by the beauty of the industrial landmarks here, you won’t be the first. With world famous artist L.S Lowry featuring Stockport in one of his paintings, people have been drawn to this place throughout the years.

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|Stockport guide

Newark guide

Newark is a bustling market town in the heart of the East Midlands. With a castle to explore, two fascinating museums, including the UK’s first dedicated English Civil War exhibition, one of the biggest and best antiques fairs in Europe and the mythical Sherwood Forest on its doorstep.

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|Newark guide

Aylesbury guide

Nestled between the rolling Cotswolds and the Chiltern Hills you’ll find Aylesbury, the county town of Buckinghamshire. This ancient market town has bags full of history beneath its belt, which you can discover by ticking off the town’s excellent local museum and National Trust attractions.

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|Aylesbury guide

Barnsley guide

Admittedly, this South Yorkshire town isn’t always the first place on people’s lists when they’re planning a trip to this corner of the country. Perhaps that’s doing Barnsley a disservice, though. For starters, the food scene isn’t the biggest, but there are a handful of restaurants that stand up to Yorkshire’s finest.

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|Barnsley guide

Basingstoke guide

Almost equidistant between London and the south coast, Basingstoke is a large, growing town with Roman roots that’s moved with the times and is now an excellent destination in its own right.

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|Basingstoke guide

Bognor Regis guide

One of the sunniest places in the UK, it’s not hard to see why so many people have fallen in love with Bognor Regis over the years. There's plenty of wide, expansive beaches, an arts and culture scene crafted by the Victorian boom and a modern day approach to al fresco eating and drinking.

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|Bognor Regis guide

Newbury guide

Did you know the Queen spent her 86th birthday here in Newbury, watching her horses from the Royal Box of Newbury Racecourse, one of the finest grounds in the UK? Or that Newbury has two Michelin Star restaurants up its sleeve? Or that Downton Abbey was filmed at the stunning Highclere Castle estate just a few miles away?

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|Newbury guide

Crewe guide

Crewe is one of the few places to be named after its railway station, instead of vice versa. That’s because, before the trains arrived, it used to be a village of 70-odd people. The station, Crewe, is Old Welsh for ‘crossing’ and highlights the excellent connections it has with the rest of the country. 

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|Crewe guide

Paignton guide

Paignton is undoubtedly one of the jewels in the Cornish crown. An Instagram-perfect town with several golden beaches, a stylish harbour and a bustling town-centre packed with bars, cafés, restaurants, high street brands and independent outlets, it’s one of our favourite south coast resorts.

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|Paignton guide

Dumfries guide

A bustling market town known locally as Queen of the South (also, handily, the name of its football club), Dumfries is a small but active town bursting with entertainment and activities. From historic castles that have helped shape Scottish history to the Robert Burns Centre with a fascinating museum dedicated to the famous Scottish author.

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|Dumfries guide

Matlock guide

A former spa town at the foot of the Peak District, Matlock is a bustling county town that’s equally at home catering to the region’s hikers and bikers as it is to young families thanks to Gulliver’s Kingdom, an aquarium, living museums and more.

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|Matlock guide

Ross-on-Wye guide

Nestled on the border of England and Wales, the picturesque town of Ross-on-Wye is the birthplace of British tourism. For centuries, the town has welcomed visitors wanting to soak up the stunning views of the Wye Valley. The local landscape inspired Wordsworth, Coleridge, Alexander Pope and countless other poets and writers.

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|Ross-on-Wye guide

Rotherham guide

The compact town centre is a great place to start exploring. Home to the ornate 14th-century Minster and the even older Roche Abbey, you’ll also find Clifton Park, a sprawling park packed with sports pitches, a water splash zone, playground and gardens alive with flowers, fruits and vegetables.

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|Rotherham guide

Skipton guide

The historic town of Skipton is, officially, The Gateway to the Dales. It’s one of the most picturesque places in Yorkshire, with historic canals and waterways flowing through the town. Here in God’s Own Country it goes without saying that the surrounding scenery is absolutely stunning.

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|Skipton guide

Walsall guide

A town that bloomed from a population of 2,000 to over 80,000 during the industrial revolution, Walsall has a history as a hotbed of industry, notably its leather making skills. And those continue to this day, as the town still makes leather handbags for the Royal Family, while the fascinating Walsall Leather Museum charts the growth and importance of the industry on the town.

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|Walsall guide

Watford guide

Just 15 miles from London, Watford sprang to life after the Industrial Revolution and is now a fully fledged destination in its own right in the modern day. With sprawling shopping malls, over 40 parks and gardens, a magical Harry Potter World experience, several outstanding theatres and live music venues, a Premier League football team plus a thriving food and nightlife scene, the town has plenty to offer.

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|Watford guide

Wigan guide

Tucked away between the big cities of Liverpool and Manchester, Wigan is a large town with a lot to shout about. Its proud population of ‘Wiganers’, which includes famous names such as Sir Ian McKellen and the late George Formby, have recently been declared the happiest people in Greater Manchester.

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|Wigan guide

Kendal guide

Kendal is the gateway to the Lake District and a truly wonderful town teeming with history, culture and personality. If you’re visiting for the walking, hiking, biking and boating in the Lake District, Kendal is the perfect base in the north-west, packed full with cafés, bars, pubs, restaurants and coffee shop.

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|Kendal guide

Salford guide

Salford is one of the most up-and-coming cities in the UK, with developments such as MediaCityUK and Salford Quays spearheading the influx of development in the area. However, it may surprise you to find out that 60% of the 37 square miles of this city is made up of green space, such as countryside, parks and leafy canal trails.

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|Salford guide

Huddersfield guide

Surrounded by the spectacular scenery of the south Pennines, Huddersfield is perfectly located for anyone interested in making the most of the great outdoors. But this bustling market town, located halfway between Leeds and Manchester, has plenty of other strings to its bow.

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|Huddersfield guide

Croydon guide

Croydon is a vibrant town in South London with a rich musical culture. Home to The BRIT School, icons such as Amy Winehouse, Adele and Leona Lewis have all spent their formative years here. That creative culture is reflected in a number of the towns restaurants, bars, attractions and entertainment spots.

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|Croydon guide

Chippenham guide

Tucked away in a picturesque corner of Wiltshire County, with the stunning Cotswolds Area of Natural Beauty on its doorstep, and a rich history which goes back to the Roman times, Chippenham is one of the great market towns of the South West, and a wonderful place to visit.

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|Chippenham guide

Minehead guide

Make your way to Minehead if you want to see beauty in the great outdoors. This corner of Somerset marks the beginning of the South West Coast Path which loops its way around Cornwall and Devon for more than 600 miles to Poole Harbour in Dorset. It’s one of the great walks of the world.

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|Minehead guide

Redditch guide

Let’s start with some fascinating facts about Redditch: it was once responsible for creating 90% of the world’s needles at its peak while at various times it’s dominated the fishing tackle and spring industries. Perhaps it’s most interesting – and relevant fact – is that it became a model for modern new towns in the 1960s.

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|Redditch guide

Dunfermline guide

Once the capital of Scotland, Dunfermline is packed full of history and culture – you only have to look at the Abbey & Palace, the resting ground for Robert Bruce (minus his heart), alongside seven of Scotland’s other kings, to see the importance the town once had.

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|Dunfermline guide

Greenwich guide

The rest of the planet is playing catch up with the Royal Borough of Greenwich. Opposite the Isle of Dogs, this wonderful part of London is home to the Royal Observatory, where you can walk the Meridian Line marking longitude zero and the point from which the rest of the world measures their time.

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|Greenwich guide

St. Albans guide

One of the smaller British cities, with a population just over 50,000, St Albans has an amazing heritage stretching back to the Roman and Medieval era. You can discover the city’s fascinating history for yourself at Verulamium Park which retraces the city’s Roman footsteps, as well as the stunning cathedral.

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|St. Albans guide

Aberystwyth guide

A stunning seaside resort on the western edge of Wales, Aberystwyth has long been a go-to holiday destination thanks to its fantastic scenery, Instagram-worthy beaches and history and heritage which stretches back to the Iron Age.

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|Aberystwyth guide

Hemel Hempstead guide

Despite Hemel Hempstead being one of Britain’s post-WWII new towns, it has heaps more history than you might expect. The Hertfordshire town dates back to the 8th century and has given the world famous names like Roger Moore and Pigwidgeon – the famous fictional owl of Harry Potter celebre. 

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|Hemel Hempstead guide

Bridgend guide

Bridgend has historically been an important town in South Wales. It sits slap bang in the middle of Cardiff and Swansea, and for centuries, people came through Bridgend across the River Ogmore via The Old Bridge.

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|Bridgend guide

Horsham guide

Enjoy your time in Horsham with the help of our local guide to this pretty market town of West Sussex. There’s beauty at every turn in this wonderful part of the country. To the north you can delve into the Surrey Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, go west and explore the South Downs National Park, or east there’s the High Wealds and the Kent Downs.

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|Horsham guide

Bradford guide

Welcome to the city of dreams, the former curry capital of Britain, the epicentre of the Industrial Revolution, the wool capital of the world, the birthplace of the Bronte sisters, the hometown of David Hockney, the city of Seabrook crisps, one of the oldest concert halls in Europe, and the inaugural UNESCO City of Film; welcome to Bradford.

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|Bradford guide

Llandudno guide

It’s hard to sum up Llandudno, so broad is the Welsh town’s history. Initially a mining town that dated back to the early Stone Age, the town was transformed into a Victorian seaside resort in 1847 making the most of Llandudno’s huge bay, sandy beaches and the dominating presence of Great Orme, a towering limestone headland that rises out of the Irish Sea.

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|Llandudno guide

Grantham guide

Grantham is well known for the happy accident of an apple falling onto the head of one Sir Isaac Newton, inspiring his theory of gravity, and changing the course of history. A trip to Woolsthorpe Manor to see the tree is one of the top attractions in Grantham.

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|Grantham guide

Altrincham guide

Wind the clocks back a decade, and you’ll find Altrincham was a sleepy town with a scary amount of empty shops and a population that went elsewhere for pretty much anything. Fast forward to the present, and you’d be forgiven for thinking we’d confused Altrincham for a different town entirely.

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|Altrincham guide

Arundel guide

A market town steeped in history, Arundel is a real jewel on the West Sussex coast. While the jaw-dropping castle and cathedral might be the main tourist attractions, there’s plenty to enjoy in this charming town nestled on the banks of the River Arun just a few miles from the south coast.

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|Arundel guide

Glastonbury guide

Best known for its world-famous music festival, there’s much more to Glastonbury than big bands and rock ’n’ roll. Doused in spirituality, the town is a popular year-round tourist destination thanks to its healing waters, the imposing Glastonbury Tor and its fascinating Abbey. 

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|Glastonbury guide

Falkirk guide

A short drive from both Edinburgh and Glasgow, this large town in the Forth Valley brilliantly blends history and modernism. On the one hand, it’s a region blessed with historic castles, lovingly restored stately homes and some incredible Roman ruins, including the Antonine Wall, while on the other, it’s created forward-thinking works of art (the magnificent Kelpies) and a world-class rotating boat lift system.

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|Falkirk guide

Shrewsbury guide

It’s no surprise that Shrewsbury gets named one of the happiest places to live in the UK. Nestled in a nook of the River Severn, the historic ‘Town of Flowers’ offers photo opportunities at every turn. Plus, with over 1,000 years of history to its name – much of it intertwined with the castle and abbey – there’s plenty of fascinating days out, too.

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|Shrewsbury guide

Stoke-on-Trent

Stoke-on-Trent is famous for many things. The city’s pottery industry conquered the world, so too did Robbie Williams, and Phil ‘The Power’ Taylor, for that matter. Admittedly, Captain Edward Smith fell short when he fired up the engines of the Titanic.

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|Stoke-on-Trent guide

Lichfield guide

Samuel Johnson, Lichfield’s most famous son, and the most esteemed critic in the history of English literature, described his hometown as the ‘City of Philosophers’. Lichfield has raised an uncanny number of England’s great thinkers. There must be something about the city’s Georgian architecture and pretty Staffordshire scenery that leads its people to lofty thoughts.

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|Lichfield guide

Winchester guide

Come and visit England's original capital city. Winchester’s rich heritage harks back to the Iron Age, and its list of historic attraction reads like a who’s who of the best days out in Hampshire.

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|Winchester guide

Peterborough guide

Between Burghley House, Peterborough Cathedral, the Key Theatre, and the East of England Showground, there’s all manner of reasons to visit the heritage city of Peterborough.

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|Peterborough guide

Lowestoft guide

The most easterly town in England, Lowestoft is the quintessential seaside resort, having marketed itself as the Sunrise Coast for decades. There are plenty of wide, sandy beaches popular during summer and the Claremont Pier includes a range of cafés, bars, a roller skating rink and an arcade.

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|Lowestoft guide

Truro guide

Truro – a name derived from the Cornish term ‘Tri-veru’, meaning ‘three rivers’ – is Cornwall’s only city. It acts as a hub for the county and boasts some of its best dining and leisure facilities, as well as a selection of fantastic nearby activities and landmarks, so you’ll never be left wondering what to do in Truro.

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|Truro guide

Worcester guide

Nestled on the banks of the River Severn, West Midlands’ Worcester has everything you could want from a city with a stunning medieval Cathedral, a rich vein of history illustrated by some outstanding museums and galleries and well-preserved buildings stretching back centuries.

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|Worcester guide

Boston guide

Surrounded by the wide open spaces of Lincolnshire, there’s plenty to enjoy in Boston if you’re a fan of the Great Outdoors. As well as enjoying the view from the famous Stump or spotting birdlife, you can admire the town’s interesting medieval buildings or sample fresh local veg from its historic market.

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|Boston guide

Halifax guide

From the West Yorkshire town that gave the world Ed Sheeran, Toffee Crisps and Rolos comes a local guide chock-a-block with good eating, top drinking, quality days out, and excellent evening entertainment. Halifax may play a supporting role to Leeds and Bradford, but it’s home to some of the top attractions in the county.

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|Halifax guide

Wolverhampton guide

The Wolverhampton coat of arms is inscribed with the motto ‘Out of darkness cometh light’. So it’s fitting that this once smog-filled corner of the Black Country is shining bright with brilliant days out, a delicious food scene and a great nightlife scene.

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|Wolverhampton guide

Maidstone guide

In the heart of the garden of England, a short drive from the Kent Downs and to the south coast, Maidstone is right in the middle of the action. A historic town with a modern feel, Maidstone has everything from stunning medieval castles, leafy country parks and fascinating museums.

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|Maidstone guide

Chesterfield guide

Known for its famously twisted Crooked Spire, Chesterfield nestles on the fringes of the glorious rolling hills of the Peak District, with the stunning Chatsworth Hall within easy day-trip distance.

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|Chesterfield guide

Ashford guide

A bustling county town a short distance from London and just 15-miles from Dover and Folkestone, Ashford is a vibrant, modern town with a thriving food, culture and outdoor scene. Those who like to get out and about will appreciate the nearby North Downs.

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|Ashford guide

Stafford guide

With places like Alton Towers, Cannock Chase, and Shugborough Hall within easy driving distance, there’s no shortage of great days out here in the county town of Staffordshire.

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|Stafford guide

Luton guide

Home to one of the busiest airports in the UK, one of the largest one-day festivals in Luton Carnival and with a history going back 250,000 years, Luton is packed full of culture, entertainment and history. 

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|Luton guide

Hounslow guide

With strong connections to central London, and on the doorstep of the second busiest airport in the world, Hounslow has a lot going for it. But there’s a lot more to the London suburb than just its proximity to Heathrow Airport. With Kew Palace & Gardens a short drive away, you can be in the middle of one of the densest and diverse plant populations on earth.

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|Hounslow guide

Twickenham guide

Perhaps best known for being the home of English rugby thanks to the towering 82,000 capacity Twickenham Stadium, Twickenham is a bustling London suburb, 10 miles west of the city centre. Twickenham Stadium, the largest dedicated rugby ground in the world.

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|Twickenham guide

High Wycombe guide

Nestling in the scenic surroundings of the Chiltern Hills, High Wycombe is a historic town which combines metropolitan sophistication with olde worlde charm. Considering how close it is to the M25, London’s orbital motorway, it retains much of its rural appeal.

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|High Wycombe guide

Warwick guide

Wondering what to do in Warwick? Well, you’ve come to the right place. The charming county town is one of the hidden gems of the Midlands. Its breathtaking castle alone is enough to make it well worth a trip, but there’s far more to it than that.

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|Warwick guide

Stansted guide

A classic English village steeped in history thanks to its Norman castle, historic nearby hunting forests and world famous art exhibits, the Essex village is also on the doorstep of Stansted Airport, the fourth busiest UK airport. 

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|Stansted guide

Woking guide

Just 20 miles from the centre of London, there’s much more to Woking than just being a satellite town to the nation’s capital. A wonderfully modern town, and the largest in Surrey, Woking is a winning mix of the old and the new.

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|Woking guide

Slough guide

Unfairly maligned as the host town in hit UK mockumentary sitcom The Office, Slough hasn’t always had the best reputation thanks to Ricky Gervais and his comedy chums but there are amazing attractions, days out, entertainment and culinary scene right on Slough’s doorstep.

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|Slough guide

Grimsby guide

Don’t miss the chance to learn about the incredible hardships endured by its brave trawlermen, and then enjoy the fruits of their efforts at one of Grimsby’s many mouthwatering fish and chip shops.

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|Grimsby guide

Cleethorpes guide

The Lincolnshire coastline is famous for its golden sands, but it has lots more to offer than that. Cleethorpes Beach is less well-known than resorts like Skegness, but it’s a hidden gem with a historic pier.

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|Cleethorpes guide

Tamworth guide

While Tamworth has an enviable history, including one of the best-preserved Medieval motte-and-bailey castles, it’s the modern elements that provide some of the best activities and entertainment. The Snowdome is the UK’s first ever indoor snow centre while Drayton Manor Park is one of the UK’s best theme parks and zoos.

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|Tamworth guide

Ramsgate guide

Ramsgate was one of Britain’s great seaside towns, enjoying its heyday during the 19th century. In recent times, Ramsgate has regained its status as one of the best resort towns in the country, along with the towns of Broadstairs and Margate also on the Thanet coast. 

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|Ramsgate guide

Malvern guide

A Victorian spa town with roots back to the Bronze Age, Malvern is a hidden jewel in the West Midlands. The compact town centre is alive with history and sights alongside an impressive eating-out and pub scene, all set to the backdrop of the gorgeous Malvern Hills, a designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

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|Malvern guide

Guildford guide

The gorgeous town of Guildford, with its granite-cobbled High Street, a millennium of history beneath its belt and the stunning Surrey Hills on its doorstep, is a picture-perfect place to stay in Britain.

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|Guildford guide

Worthing guide

Worthing has come a long way since the 19th century when it was home to a hive of smugglers who used to battle it out with coastguards to bring their ill-gotten goods ashore. The West Sussex town has grown into a holiday destination in its own right and a worthy alternative to its nearby big brother, Brighton.

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|Worthing guide

Hereford guide

With its historic streets, magnificent cathedral, picturesque location on the River Wye and the Wye Valley Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty on its doorstep, it’s no wonder Hereford is such a hot place to visit right now.

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|Hereford guide

Darlington guide

The picturesque market town, lovingly known as ‘Darlo’, can go under the radar, but it’s brimming with excellent days out, a plentiful population of pubs and a food scene that boasts the north east’s only restaurant with two Michelin stars.

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|Darlington guide

Loughborough guide

Loughborough might be best known as a university town and for its sporting heritage – it’s the home of several world-class sporting facilities – but the Midlands town is a bustling, lively hub with plenty of attractions. Leading the way is Queen’s Park in the centre of town, a leafy park home to the fascinating Charnwood Museum.

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|Loughborough guide

Bangor guide

Located at the gateway to the Snowdonia National Park, the north Welsh town is the perfect base to explore the great outdoors. Snowdon, the highest mountain in Wales, is less than 20 miles from the town centre.

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|Bangor guide

Wrexham guide

Straddling the English/Welsh border, Wrexham is the largest town in north Wales positively alive with history. It houses the oldest medieval church in Wales, while – somewhat unbelievably – Wrexham FC are the third-oldest football club in the world.

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|Wrexham guide

Romford guide

Romford gets mixed reviews, but as far as we’re concerned, it’s a great place to visit. It has some of the liveliest nightlife in Essex – which says a lot – and a food scene featuring some seriously tasty restaurants. There are a couple of theatres for you to choose from if you fancy a bit of culture, not to mention one of just two dog tracks left in London.

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|Romford guide

Farnham guide

Nestled on the edge of the South Downs Hills, Farnham is a small but bustling town with a rich history stretching back to the Stone Age. The medieval Farnham Castle overlooks the charming town centre alive with cool cafes and coffee shops, traditional pubs, plenty of top-notch restaurants and several busy shopping streets. 

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|Farnham guide

Whitstable guide

Revel in the beauty of one of Britain’s quintessential seaside towns with a trip to the historic fishing village of Whitstable. Residents have been shucking sea-fresh oysters in these parts since Roman times. The town is famous for its native oysters, which can be found in nigh on every restaurant in town.

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|Whitstable guide

Lymington guide

With its cobbled streets, large marina and proximity to the New Forest, Lymington is a real south-coast gem. The small seaside town is a haven for tourists and locals, with historic forts, classic car museums and sea water play parks a short distance from the town centre.

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|Lymington guide

Farnborough guide

World-renowned thanks to the biennial Air Show, there’s plenty more to Farnborough than dramatic aerobatics and Red Arrow displays. The Hampshire town is roughly halfway between Southampton and London and boasts plenty of activities and entertainment.

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|Farnborough guide

Barnstaple guide

The medieval town of Barnstaple is one of the oldest in Britain and among the busiest in North Devon. It boomed thanks to its wool industry and from then on has remained a prosperous place to live and a beautiful town to visit.

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|Barnstaple guide

Andover guide

Nestled by the River Anton in the shadow of the North Sussex Downs, Andover is a lively commuter town located halfway between London and Exeter. The town’s location has proved crucial to its success. Firstly, as the perfect place to construct Medieval watermills and secondly as a stopping point for travellers between London and Exeter in the 18th century.

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|Andover guide

Knutsford guide

Brush shoulders with celebrities, sample the acclaimed food scene and pay a visit to the famous Tatton Park estate during your stay in beautiful Knutsford. The historic town sits on the edge of Cheshire’s Golden Triangle, between the Welsh mountains to the west and the Peak District to the east.

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|Knutsford guide

Bury St. Edmunds guide

The historic market town of Bury St Edmunds is a fine place for a long weekend. You can trace its fascinating heritage with top-class attractions such as Ickworth House and Bury St Edmunds Abbey.

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|Bury St. Edmunds guide

Ealing guide

Once a village on the edge of London, Ealing was swallowed up in the 20th-century urban sprawl, becoming part of Greater London in 1965. Surprisingly, the community spirit lives on with much of the action centred around Ealing Broadway, Walpole Park and Ealing Common, each area alive with shops, bars, pubs, cafes and restaurants. 

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|Ealing guide

Torquay guide

It’s not hard to see why Torquay has been nicknamed the English Riviera. With balmy summer weather, miles of tropical blue coastline and some spectacular cliff-top settings, the Devon seaside town has long been a go-to holiday destination in the UK.

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|Torquay guide

Weston-super-Mare guide

Literally meaning Weston-on-Sea, Weston-super-Mare grew from a collection of fishing villages into a leading Victorian resort. Thanks to its large tidal range which sees the Irish Sea cover over a mile of sand and mud flats, the area has some of the best beaches in the country including Brean Beach which is one of the longest in Europe.

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|Weston-super-Mare guide

Margate guide

Margate is one of Britain’s quintessential seaside resorts, with a great big beach with gorgeous golden sands, a harbour filled with pleasure boats and dinghies, a seafront promenade of attractions and the delicious aroma of fish and chips following you wherever you go.

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|Margate guide

Livingston guide

You’ll fall in love with the town’s fantastic range of days out. Wildlife lovers can take their pick from zoos and the Scottish Owl Centre. Foodies will have fun filling up on the fab menus of our favourite restaurants.

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|Livingston guide

Thirsk guide

Romantic, alluring, historic and perfect for nature- and animal-lovers, Thirsk is one of Yorkshire’s hidden gems. The small market town dates back centuries, with history at every turn including St Mary’s Church, Thirsk Museum and The World of James Herriot, which tells the tale of Thirsk’s most famous vet son.

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|Thirsk guide

Gateshead guide

The Gateshead skyline is dominated by some iconic silhouettes, including world-class venues, magnificent feats of architecture and one of the most famous sculptures on the planet. The Angel of the North watches over the town and welcomes you on the way to one of our Newcastle hotels.

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|Gateshead guide

Canterbury guide

History looms large in Canterbury. From the Roman walls which still ring the city centre to the stunning cathedral which is one of the oldest places of worship in the UK, the south-east city is steeped in history and heritage.

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|Canterbury guide

Tenby guide

The picture-perfect town of Tenby is the ideal destination for a staycation. With its iconic pastel-coloured houses, magnificent medieval castle and walls and the beautiful Caldey Island just a short boat trip away, what more could you want?

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|Tenby guide

Southport guide

A north-west town blessed with 22 miles of coastline looking out to the Irish Sea, Southport is a grand and historic seaside resort home to world-class golf courses, the oldest iron pier in the country, water parks, theme parks and an impressive independent nightlife and eating out scene.

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|Southport guide

Buxton guide

High in the Peak District, the beautiful spa town of Buxton has been welcoming visitors with warm spring waters and wonderful attractions for centuries. The Regency town is a resplendent gateway to the Peak District National Park thanks to its impressive architecture and one of the finest Frank Matcham theatres in Britain.

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|Buxton guide

Kings Lynn guide

The picturesque market town of King’s Lynn dates back to medieval times and features fantastic historic attractions such as Castle Rising and King’s Lynn Minster, which can take you on a history trip back to the 12th century. The town’s most famous nearby attraction, of course, is the Queen’s private residence, the stunning Sandringham House.

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|Kings Lynn guide

Kettering guide

With famous comedy figures such as James Acaster and Hugh Dennis hailing from Kettering, you’d be forgiven for thinking you need a sense of humour to stay in the Northamptonshire town. The truth is it’s a great place to visit. Kettering is one of the fastest-growing towns in the UK.

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|Kettering guide

Elgin guide

It was nearby the town of Elgin where Macbeth defeated King Duncan in a battle immortalised by Shakespeare. That’s just the beginning of the fascinating history trip you can enjoy when exploring ancient Elgin, including the ruins of its impressive cathedral and Duffus Castle.

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|Elgin guide

Brentwood guide

Whether you want to rub shoulders with celebrities in the best bars and restaurants in Essex, get outdoors in the stunning local countryside or get your adrenaline pumping with skiing and zombie hunting, there’s something for everyone in Brentwood.

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|Brentwood guide

Clapham guide

An essential London district, Clapham brilliantly blends the modern urban demands of inner-city life. The London Underground Zone 2 suburb is ripe for exploring, with bustling street markets, independent cafes and bars and several theatres, cinemas, art galleries and live music venues right on the doorstep.

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|Clapham guide

Maidenhead guide

Maidenhead might not leap out at you from a map of England, but delve into the history and culture of the region and you’ll soon fall in love with its charm. The Berkshire town 30-miles west of London is a Michelin-star hot spot, home to some of the UK’s best restaurants including several from Heston Blumenthal and the Roux family.

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|Maidenhead guide

Hatfield guide

Hatfield is a town of two halves. It stems from the fact that Hatfield is one of Britain’s post-war new towns. The modern side of Hatfield is where you’ll find The Galleria, Hatfield’s excellent shopping centre, as well as some of our top restaurant recommendations and a couple of our favourite pubs.

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|Hatfield guide

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Our local guides to cities in Germany

Looking for attractions, entertainment,  great food or shopping? Our local guides to German cities are here to help.

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Hamburg guide

With the Elbe river connecting the city to the North Sea, Hamburg has a host of attractions and activities to suit every taste.  Explore the city’s legendary port, marvel at the impressive architecture, or immerse yourself in one of the many fascinating museums.

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Munich guide

Munich has so much more to offer than just Oktoberfest and FC Bayern Munich. This welcoming, cosmopolitan city in Southern Germany is brimming with cultural and culinary diversity. Tourists should expect a multi-faceted city with famous landmarks and top-quality attractions.

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Leipzig guide

Leipzig is spectacular proof of how much Eastern Germany has to offer. This modern city features a burgeoning creative scene and vibrant diversity. There’s plenty to see and do, not just in the city centre but also in the outer districts.

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