Attractions in Brighton

Brighton is home to more than 1,200 listed buildings, so it should come as no surprise that there are a fair few attractions dotted around for you to see. From an infamous 13th-century haunted manor house through to regency townhouses, a commemorative jubilee clock, war memorials and much, much more; there are all kinds of Brighton tourist attractions to keep you busy.

Show more
Show less

Historic buildings

Brighton is home to one of the most stunning buildings in the entire country. Visiting the Royal Pavilion and its stunning gardens can feel like you’re on the other side of the world. The architecture is heavily influenced by the Taj Mahal. It was the former royal residence of the Prince Regent, who later became King George IV. Bought by Brighton in 1850, for the measly sum of £53,000, it transitioned from palace to public attraction. Nowadays, more than 400,000 people visit the Royal Pavilion each year. We thoroughly recommend getting away from the hustle and bustle of Brighton city centre to see it for yourself. Pay a visit and you can explore the jaw-dropping banqueting room, the ornately decorated music room, the cavernous great kitchen, the exquisite royal bedrooms and much more.

Meanwhile, the royal stables have been transformed into the Brighton Dome, one of the leading venues for entertainment in Brighton.

One of the city centre’s iconic landmarks and a popular meeting point is the Jubilee Clock Tower that was built in 1888 to commemorate Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee. From tip to toe, it rises more than 90 feet above the ground, at the point where North Street bisects Queens Road.

Heading towards Hove, you’ll find The Regency Town House. Built in the 1820s, the Grade I listed terraced house is typical of Georgian period regency architecture. Inside, visitors can step back in time to see what Victorian life was like in Brighton during the 19th century. Another historic building from the 1820s (although they look absolutely nothing alike) is the West Blatchington Windmill; a three-storey smock mill that’s been painstakingly restored and preserves all of its original mill workings to provide a fascinating insight into how grain is turned into flour.

It’s about a 20-minute drive from our Brighton City Centre hotel, but if you want to take in some stunning views of the South Downs and pay your respects at a site of military history, take the bridleway to the Chattri Monument. It stands 500 feet above the city at the exact location where Indian soldiers who fought for the British Empire were cremated. Made from white Sicilian marble, it’s a beautiful structure with a poignant history.

In terms of religious buildings, one of the prettiest in Brighton is St. Peter’s Church. Plus, it’s just a 15-minute walk from Brighton Beach, so you really don’t have to go far out of your way to take a look around this fine church.

In terms of supernatural attractions, one of the spookiest in Britain is Preston Manor. As well as having a long history of ghostly sightings, it’s also a fascinating manor house dating back to the 13th century, with original features still surviving today. Housed inside is also a museum where you can find out what life was like during the Edwardian era, both ‘upstairs’ for the high society, and ‘downstairs’ for the servants. The surrounding grounds also contain a delightful 18th-century flint-walled garden, and an eerie pet cemetery too.

Show more
Show less
Royal Pavilion

Royal Pavilion

Show more
Show less
Pavilion Gardens

Pavilion Gardens

Show more
Show less
Brighton Pavilion

Brighton Pavilion

Show more
Show less

Parks

If you’re looking for a nice green space where you can enjoy a walk on a sunny day, Stanmer Park near the Amex stadium is right up there as one of your best options in Brighton. It’s got stunning parkland, traditional woodland and some delightful tea rooms. Wildlife enthusiasts can head down to try and see buzzards, kestrels, deer and foxes. While the picturesque 18th-century village of Stanmer is full of history and heritage, most notably Stanmer House, which was built in 1722 and is open to the public and houses a fine restaurant.

Preston Park is another popular option. It also happens to be one of Brighton’s largest parks, spanning a quarter of a million square metres with beautiful parkland, rose gardens, bowling greens, tennis courts, a pond and the oldest cycle track in the UK, which was handbuilt by the British Army in 1877. Its great location to the north of the city centre has helped Preston Park host a number of the top events that contribute so much to Brighton’s culture, such as Brighton Pride, Brighton Festival and the start of the Brighton Marathon. You can also visit the nearby Blakers Park, which is a lovely little pocket of green space in the heart of the family-friendly fiveways neighbourhood of Brighton. It has a nice café, some wonderful birdlife, and – at the right time of year – bluebells too.

If you’re paying a visit to the Royal Pavilions, then of course, you’ll want to take some time to explore the absolutely stunning Pavilion Gardens. But, the nearby Victoria Gardens are worth taking a look around too, particularly if you fancy having a nosy at the area’s regency architecture. A couple of other honourable mentions go to Hove Park, which – if you find yourself west of the city centre – is the perfect place to go for a picnic. While, if you don’t mind heading further afield, the famous Devil’s Dyke is an awe-inspiring 100m deep valley in the South Downs Way.

Show more
Show less

Arenas

Of the city’s arenas, the Brighton Centre is the most famous. It’s the largest venue of its kind in southern England. If you want to find out more about the excellent range of shows, events and conferences it hosts, take a look at the dedicated page we’ve put together for the 5,000-capacity arena.

You may also want to pay a visit to Brighton Racecourse. It’s not your typical racecourse, that’s for sure. For starters, it dates back to the 18th century. On top of that, it’s one the rare tracks that doesn’t form a complete circuit, but rather consists of a one and a half mile horseshoe. Sitting 400 feet above sea level, it’s certainly a picturesque place for a day at the races, even if the quality of races can’t compete with National Hunt racecourses.

Show more
Show less

Stadiums

There are two stadiums for you to check out in Brighton. The first is for football fans: the Amex stadium, or to give it its original title, the Falmer Stadium, is the home of Brighton & Hove Albion FC. You’ll find it out of town in the village of Falmer, about halfway between the city centre and our Lewes Town Centre hotel.

The second is Brighton & Hove Greyhound Stadium. In terms of greyhound racing, it’s one of the best stadiums in the country. For going on 100 years, it has been the home of some of the top trainers in the sport. If you fancy a flutter, admission is free from Tuesday through to Friday, while you’ll have to pay a few quid on Saturdays.

Show more
Show less