Activities in Weymouth

If you’re wondering what to do with your spare time in Weymouth, take a look through our activities guide. Whether you want to be out in the elements, or perhaps the weather’s forcing you indoors, there’s a whole lot of attractions and activities to choose from between the harbour and the surrounding area.

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Outdoor activities

Dorset is lucky to get some of the best weather in the country. It means that there’s a good chance you’ll be able to get outdoors to try your hand at Weymouth’s wide range of activities. Wander along Weymouth Harbour and surround yourself with the charm of the town’s oldest buildings and the local fishing vessels. If you want to take to the sea, a peaceful boat trip to Portland doesn’t cost a lot. Got a need for speed? Visit Weymouth Bay Rib Charters for their speedboat tour of the bay. Or, if you’d prefer to stick to dry land, you can go on a Jurassic Safari – where you can venture off the beaten track in one of the tour Land Rovers to see the wilder side of Dorset’s natural beauty.

Away from the town centre, there’s plenty to do in Abbotsbury. The pick of the bunch is Abbotsbury Swannery – it’s the only place in the whole world where you can walk through a colony of mute swans. The Abbotsbury Children’s Farm lets little ones get up close and personal with familiar farmyard animals, such as lambs and ponies. Last but not least, there’s also the Grade I-listed Abbotsbury Subtropical Gardens. Spanning 20 acres, you can find exotic plants and beautifully manicured gardens.

If you’re visiting all three of Abbotsbury’s main attractions, then you can purchase a ‘passport’ ticket that works out cheaper than buying individual entry to each one. Don’t worry, there’s no expiry date so you won’t have to rush to see everything.

In terms of sporting activities, Warmwell Holiday Park Ski Slope is just a 15-minute drive from our Weymouth Seafront hotel. There are a number of different slopes, offering something different for all ages and abilities, including a great nursery slope where kids (and adventurous adults) can learn how to ski.

Up the coast from Weymouth town centre, extreme sports enthusiasts can make their way to The Front Skatepark. It’s an impressive predominantly outdoor park that’s been designed with transitions in mind. There’s also an undercover area for beginners where the ramps are rather less daunting.

Meanwhile, if you want to ruin a good walk (just kidding), keen golfers can enjoy a round at Weymouth Golf Club, which has been around for over 100 years. If you need further convincing, the course was designed by legendary golfer, and renowned course architect, James Braid. On the other hand, there’s always Pirate Adventure Golf too, if you prefer the ‘crazy’ kind of golf.


To find out more about all the fantastic outdoor activities in Weymouth, visit our dedicated page.

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Our video guide to Weymouth activities

Indoor activities

When the weather turns and indoor activities become your only option, you can always enjoy the company of penguins, seals, sharks and more at Weymouth Sea Life Adventure Park in Lodmoor Country Park.

Enjoy making sandcastles when you were younger? Then you’ll love Sandworld Sculpture Park – a marvellous home for giant sand sculptures. Plus, it's indoors, so the sculptors (who come from around the world) need fear neither sea nor rain. Every year, a different theme is chosen, which inspires the sand sculptures that are jaw-dropping not only for their size but also their sheer degree of detail.

Come rain or shine, the Cineworld Weymouth is always an option when you’re wondering what to do. Located on New Bond Street, it has nine screens in total and, as you’d expect, you’ll find all the latest blockbusters on show.

If you want to spend a day enjoying some of the best indoor activities in Weymouth, make sure you visit our dedicated page for more information.

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Cycling trails

We’ve already mentioned the speedboat tours of Weymouth Bay Rib Charters, but there are plenty of other tours and walking trails that deserve your attention.

The Portland Plateau comes in just shy of five miles. The route boasts some stunning scenery, as well as a number of military structures, including the Grade II-listed Verne High Angle Battery from the 19th century.

Weymouth also finds itself on the South West Coast Path. This National Trail is England’s longest waymarked footpath at 630 miles from start to finish. You can pick it up from nearby Abbotsbury for the last 60 or so miles.

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Weymouth Harbour

Weymouth Harbour

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Abbotsbury Swannery

Abbotsbury Swannery

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Weymouth Beach

Weymouth Beach

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Walking tours

Weymouth finds itself on a number of different cycling trails. The National Cycle Network Route 26 spans 81 miles to join Portishead and the Isle of Portland together, with the last leg working its way through Weymouth.

The Rodwell Trail, also known as the Weymouth Portland Railway Walk, is roughly four miles long and takes its route from a disused passenger railway line. It’s a lovely trail that offers great views across Portland Harbour and gives you the chance to spot local birds, plants and butterflies.

The Jurassic Cycle Trails are actually a collection of three family-friendly cycling routes that let you enjoy the stunning scenery of this special corner of the country. Bring along a picnic and make a day of it; there are plenty of spots to catch your breath and munch on a sarnie.

For you hardcore cyclists out there, we’ll give Tour de Manche a mention. Weymouth is on the route of this gruelling 1,200km tour that connects Brittany, Normandy, Dorset and Devon.

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Beaches

Weymouth Beach is your quintessential British bit of seaside, with golden sands, donkey rides, deckchairs, Punch and Judy, and gentle shallow seas. The beach runs along the esplanade, ending at Weymouth Pier.

On the south-west-facing side of the town is Chesil Bank (or, depending on who you’re talking to, Chesil Beach). A whopping 18 miles long, 200 metres wide and 15 metres high, the bank is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and one of three major shingle structures in Britain. It has a horrible history laden with shipwrecks, so much so that legendary novelist Thomas Hardy nicknamed it ‘Dead Man’s Bay’.

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