Hotels in Saxony

Welcome to Saxony, the East German state where out-of-this-world scenery, culture-packed cities and fairy-tale palaces await you. Bordering Poland and the Czech Republic, Saxony’s breath-taking landscapes have inspired many classical artworks, making it a true paradise for cyclists, hikers and nature lovers. Prefer the buzz of the city? Then head to Leipzig or Dresden, Germany’s two largest cities outside of Berlin. Saxony’s vibrant capital city Dresden is often compared to Florence thanks to its incredible architecture, while Leipzig has an unparalleled musical heritage to explore.  

Staying at one of our Premier Inn hotels in Saxony lets you explore all the fascinating history and heritage the region has to offer.  

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Saxony hotels

Dresden City Centre

Dr.-Külz-Ring 15A

01067 Dresden

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Leipzig City Oper

Goethestraße 9

04109 Leipzig

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Leipzig City Hahnekamm

Brandenburger Straße 2B

04103 Leipzig

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Places like Saxony

If you love the beautiful landscapes, Baroque towns and rich culture of Saxony, then why not pay a visit to its neighbouring state of Bavaria? Situated to the south-west of Saxony, you can explore buzzing cities such as Munich and Nuremberg, or visit stunning Passau to find out why it’s known as ‘the Venice on the Danube’. But wherever your trip takes you, rest easy knowing that our hotels in Bavaria are ready and waiting, with super-comfy beds to relax on between adventures.

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Things to do in Saxony

Immerse yourself in nature

Love the great outdoors? Saxony’s rich landscape is criss-crossed by hiking and cycling routes. Take things easy in the lowlands, explore the gently rolling hills of the Vogtland or marvel at mountain ranges. Take your pick from the Ore Mountains, the Elbe Sandstone Mountains, the Elster Mountains or the Lusatian Mountains. The highest mountain in Saxony is the Ore Mountains’ Fichtelberg, and you can take a cable car to the top and visit the observation tower. Or head to the Saxon Switzerland National Park which contains protected areas of canyons and forests. 

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Go on a scenic train ride

Saxony is a treasure trove for rail enthusiasts, with not one but five narrow-gauge railways still in daily operation. Founded around 130 years ago by the Royal Saxon State Railways, today an extensive network of lines still stretches from the Elbe region to the Ore Mountains, taking in some beautiful scenery along the way. The best thing about the railway is that services are still so regular that you can travel as you please without any complicated planning. Just hop on board and enjoy the ride!

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Soak up the culture

With a thousand years of music, art and architecture under its belt, Saxony is brimming with culture. Music lovers should head to the Semperoper Opera House in Dresden or the Bach Museum in Leipzig, while fans of classic artwork won’t want to miss the unique Old Masters Picture Gallery in Dresden, or Leipzig’s fine art museum. Saxony is home to two UNESCO World Heritage Sites, too! There’s Muskauer Park on the Polish border and the Erzgebirge Mining Region in the Ore Mountains - both happen to cross national borders, making them symbolic of Saxony’s close bond with its neighbours.

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FAQs

Where in Germany is Saxony?

Saxony is Germany’s eastern-most state, bordering Poland and the Czech Republic. It’s also a neighbouring state to Bavaria, Thuringia, Saxony-Anhalt and Brandenburg. 

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What is the capital of Saxony?

Dresden is the state capital of Saxony and the third largest city in Germany after Berlin and Leipzig. This popular tourist destination has a beautiful Baroque city centre and is known as the Florence of the Elbe because of its art, architecture and culture.  

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What is Saxony famous for?

Once situated east of the Iron Curtain, today Saxony is an ideal destination for history lovers, art buffs and outdoor enthusiasts. Its three major cities of Dresden, Leipzig and Chemnitz once formed one of the most important industrial centres in Germany. Today, the region is widely regarded as a cultural hot spot. In fact, the city of Leipzig is recognised as an important music hub, something which its famous previous resident, the Baroque composer Johann Sebastian Bach, would be extremely proud of.

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What language is spoken in Saxony?

You’ll find German to be the most widely spoken language throughout the state, often with a Saxon accent, and the local dialect remains a strong part of the region's identity. English is also widely spoken, particularly by those in the service industry. People in the Upper Lusatia region speak Sorbian, a sister language of Polish and Czech. 

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What food is Saxony known for?

Saxony is famous for its coffee and cake, and the region has a long tradition of Kaffeehauskultur, or ‘coffee house culture’. At Christmas, coffee is served with Dresdner Stollen, a sweet bread that dates back to the 14th century. For lunch and dinner, expect meaty, hearty meals served in generous portions. Try Sächsischer Sauerbraten (a type of pot roast served with potato dumplings), Sächsische Flecke, (a traditional tripe stew) or Leberwurst with Sauerkraut (Saxony sausages cooked in onions, bacon and thyme).

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